Bad Inventions: Dimple Maker

In 1936, Isabella Gilbert of Rochester, NY developed a machine to create dimples. In order to create the desired indentations, this device was worn over the cheeks while two knobs press into the cheeks. According to the advertisement, after continual use, the device soon make a fine set of dimples. The American Medical Association argued that the Dimple Maker would not make dimples and that prolonged use of the devise may actually cause cancer. (History By Zim)

The Dimple Machine shown in an advertisement on the left while a women poses with the face device in the right photo. Photo Credit: Modern Mechanix/The Babble

In 1936, Isabella Gilbert of Rochester, New York developed a “machine” to create dimples. In order to create the desired indentations, this device was worn over the cheeks while two knobs press into the cheeks. According to the advertisement, after continual use, the device “soon make a fine set of dimples.” The American Medical Association argued that the “Dimple Maker” would not make dimples or even enlarge original dimples. They also stated that prolonged use of the devise may actually cause cancer.

Not only is the “Dimple Maker” an unfortunate invention, but it also sounds (and looks) like it would hurt!

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